LOG 26 S/Y Liv

Date: Sunday 23 January 2021

Position: 13° 0.230’ N 61° 14.495 W

SOG: 8 kn

Location: Princess Margaret Beach, Admiralty Bay, Bequia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Distance Sailed during the week: 41 NM

Distance Sailed total: 6362 NM

Weather: 🌤 26°

Most popular on the menu: S’mores 🔥🍫

Animals spotted: Turtles and tortoises, iguanas, several different rays, but also a lot of beautiful fish 🐡🐟🐠

Comment of the week: “They thought that I was so ugly so they called me Mackerel”

No visit to Clifton is complete without a visit to Happy Island, so on the last day in Clifton we finally had our drinks on the Island made of conch shells. Unfortunately we had a squall at the same time so we could not enjoy the sunset fully. But instead we went inside, and the lovely lady working there told us a lot about living in Union Island, the dialects (the local pidgin languages and dialects they speak at home) and about the nicknames they all have. Her nickname when she was younger was Mackerel, but now it was Pinky. Thank you wonderful Pinky for your kindness, hospitality and telling us about your culture and country.

We went back to the Tobago Cays one last time, for a birthday celebration out on Petit Tabac, a small island just outside the reef of the Tobago Cays. it was a wonderful party with a bonfire, and the kids (actually Sanna too!) found a new favorite dish: s’mores! A s’more is grilled marshmallows between two crackers with chocolate. Delicious! We are so glad that we decided to splurge and get a water taxi to and from our anchorage to Petit Tabac. In hindsight we can’t really imagine navigating our way back in the pitch black darkness of night, through the reef in the narrow dinghy passage (that we missed) – in the heavy wind and pouring rain we would have been miserable in our dinghy.

After leaving the Tobago Cays (that we have come to know so well) it was time to set sail to Salt Whistle Bay, an absolutely beautiful bay that looks just like a postcard. 🌴🌴 The wind was blowing heavily from the windward side of the island, which is just separated by a beach to the anchorage on the leeward side. So after a very wavy night on anchor we took a mooring ball for the first time and stayed another night. We have heard so many stories from the locals that they do not maintain the moorings (even the ones owned by the marine park) that we usually trust our own anchor more than a mooring ball.

Now it was time to start slowly goingnorth and thus far we have not had the chance to stop in Canouan. We have tried anchoring in Ance Guyac before but have had a hard time getting the anchor to set on the bottom which was either rocky bottom or 5 cm sand over hard coral, and to add there were always several other boats to consider. This time we had much more time and there was only one other boat so we could take it easy and have several tries with snorkeling to check that the anchor had set. This time we managed to find a small spot of just sand that our anchor quickly dug into deeply, it only took five attempts and a pause for lunch 😂. Ance Guyac also has the best snorkeling in the whole SVG. It was like swimming in a big aquarium with schools of colorful fishes and rays.

After some weeks out on the small islands in the southern Grenadines, a visit to Bequia was needed and welcomed. In Bequia it’s easy to do the laundry, fill our LPG bottles, buy ice so we could finally defrost the fridge and do some grocery shopping. And even though we now start to get eager to shop in more well stocked grocery stores (the selection here isn’t quite what we are used to at home in Stockholm), what we now consider as easy grocery shopping has changed quite drastically since we left last summer.

Next week – we will start the way up north, maybe we will be in Martinique next week!

Written by Susanna Edholm, edited by Hanna Ericksson


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